"Race matters. Race matters in part because of the long history of racial minorities being denied access to the political process. … Race also matters because of persistent racial inequality in society — inequality that cannot be ignored and that has produced stark socioeconomic disparities. … In my colleagues’ view, examining the racial impact of legislation only perpetuates racial discrimination. This refusal to accept the stark reality that race matters is regrettable. The way to stop discrimination on the basis of race is to speak openly and candidly on the subject of race, and to apply the Constitution with eyes open to the unfortunate effects of centuries of racial discrimination."

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, dissenting opinion in Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action (via englishprof)

Sonia Sotomayor is my hero.

(via genericlatino)

"Well, I didn’t — I wouldn’t think that. I thought, you know, you push a button, it goes right to the other thing."

John Roberts realizing that texts are routed through a service provider.

With the Supreme Court reluctant to take sides in the battle between TV networks and steaming provider Aereo, the biggest news to come out of yesterday’s oral arguments was just how clueless some of the justices appeared. Septuagenarian Antonin Scalia provided the line of the day when he seemed befuddled at the idea that HBO isn’t available over the air. Other moments of confused tech talk included Sonia Sotomayor dismantling the cred attained by owning a Roku when she asked a lawyer to talk about “iDrop in the cloud.” Oof.

In recent years, the Supreme Court has increasingly found itself tackling issues of technology, and each time, someone reveals frustrated bewilderment at those goldarn contraptions kids are obsessing over. 

Read more: 8 Times the Supreme Court Was Bewildered by Technology — NYMag

(via onaissues)
chescaleigh:

This Is The War On Drugs (via “The House I Live In”)

A call to national conscience, the activist documentary “The House I Live In” is persuasively urgent. Directed with heart by Eugene Jarecki, the movie is an insistently personal and political look at the war on drugs and its thousands of casualties, including those serving hard time for minor offenses. It is, Mr. Jarecki asserts — as he sifts through the data, weighs the evidence and checks in with those on both sides of the law — a war that has led to mass incarcerations characterized by profound racial disparities and that has created another front in the civil rights movement. (via NY Times)

Here’s the thing, going into this film I KNEW our criminal justice system was messed up, but I didn’t expect to see politicians, judges and corrections officers chiming in and demanding that the system change. THAT was incredibly eye opening for me and all the more reason that more people need to see this film. If you haven’t seen it already, “The House I Live In” is currently available for rent and instant streaming on Netflix. And if you don’t have Netflix, you’re in luck because April is officially the last month I’m able to offer my followers a free month subscription through netflix.com/chescaleigh

chescaleigh:

This Is The War On Drugs (via “The House I Live In”)

A call to national conscience, the activist documentary “The House I Live In” is persuasively urgent. Directed with heart by Eugene Jarecki, the movie is an insistently personal and political look at the war on drugs and its thousands of casualties, including those serving hard time for minor offenses. It is, Mr. Jarecki asserts — as he sifts through the data, weighs the evidence and checks in with those on both sides of the law — a war that has led to mass incarcerations characterized by profound racial disparities and that has created another front in the civil rights movement. (via NY Times)

Here’s the thing, going into this film I KNEW our criminal justice system was messed up, but I didn’t expect to see politicians, judges and corrections officers chiming in and demanding that the system change. THAT was incredibly eye opening for me and all the more reason that more people need to see this film. If you haven’t seen it already, “The House I Live In” is currently available for rent and instant streaming on Netflix. And if you don’t have Netflix, you’re in luck because April is officially the last month I’m able to offer my followers a free month subscription through netflix.com/chescaleigh

(Source: reprintvogue)

enchanted-dystopia:

cuntyhunty-y:

Nichelle Nichols, 81. Y’all better know something about black women!!!

life ambitions.

yagazieemezi:

Finding Paola Through Fanm Djanm
With a gorgeous smile and a radiating sense of style to match, Haitian beauty Paola Mathe is the founder of Fanm Djanm, a collection of head-wraps dedicated to strong women around the world.
Starring equally stunning women with their wraps uniquely placed on their heads, their colorful photo-shoot for their lookbook brings a message of bond, beauty and diversity.
See more
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic yagazieemezi:

Finding Paola Through Fanm Djanm
With a gorgeous smile and a radiating sense of style to match, Haitian beauty Paola Mathe is the founder of Fanm Djanm, a collection of head-wraps dedicated to strong women around the world.
Starring equally stunning women with their wraps uniquely placed on their heads, their colorful photo-shoot for their lookbook brings a message of bond, beauty and diversity.
See more
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

yagazieemezi:

Finding Paola Through Fanm Djanm

With a gorgeous smile and a radiating sense of style to match, Haitian beauty Paola Mathe is the founder of Fanm Djanm, a collection of head-wraps dedicated to strong women around the world.

Starring equally stunning women with their wraps uniquely placed on their heads, their colorful photo-shoot for their lookbook brings a message of bond, beauty and diversity.

See more

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

huffingtonpost:

For recipe details and the full video go here. 

Does it work for turkey?

queeniman:

dirtycartunes:

the-real-goddamazon:

thepoeticrebel:

chacha-again:

sizvideos:

Who needs traffic lights? Not the drivers in Ethiopia - Video

This made me so uncomfortable.

Christ…

Oh look it’s Abuja in a nutshell.

aside from very few intersections this how it works in haiti. most of the roads ain’t paved either (though they’ve been working on that consistently)

how do people cross the street without dying

eat-to-thrive:

Bunch of sweet, juicy ataulfo mangos for lunch today! Grateful I was able to enjoy them outside in the warm sunshine! ☀️

(Source: ABOLIDOR)

carterfamilyportraits:

If your day’s feeling a little lacklustre, why not pay a visit to the Carter Family Portrait Gallery Gift Shop? These portraits and more are available as prints, t-shirts, mugs, iPhone, iPad and laptop cases, tote bags, or even pillows - perfect for all those times you feel the need to nap on Bey’s beautiful face.

At the Carter Family Portrait Gallery Gift Shop, there truly is a Carter for every occasion.

http://society6.com/CarterFamilyPortraits 

(Source: felixguillet)

radicalrebellion:

White women (and a lot of non-Black WOC) would be better off recognizing that the only reason they get so offended when hearing “Black is beautiful” is because their entire self-image is built around being to epitome of beauty (and thus womanhood).

You are literally built…

"At least I’m not Black" syndrome.